Czechoslovakia 1918–88: Seventy Years from Independence by H. Gordon Skilling

By H. Gordon Skilling

The booklet examines the background of Czechoslovakia within the seventy years given that its founding by means of T.G.Masaryk. It analyses the profound adjustments which came about throughout the First Republic, the Nazi profession, postwar liberation and communist rule, together with either the Stalinist years, the Prague Spring of 1968 and the next interval of normalization to 1988.

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Czechoslovakia 1918–88: Seventy Years from Independence

The booklet examines the heritage of Czechoslovakia within the seventy years seeing that its founding via T. G. Masaryk. It analyses the profound alterations which happened through the First Republic, the Nazi profession, postwar liberation and communist rule, together with either the Stalinist years, the Prague Spring of 1968 and the following interval of normalization to 1988.

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Sample text

It was suggested by Ingeborg Meckling that until March 1918 an agreement among the nationalities of the Habsburg Monarchy could have been possible, had the Vienna government drawn consequences from the disastrous situation without relying on the dubious support of the German ally. 45 But the fact that for so many years before the war Austria was unable to free herself from the German bond makes this assumption rather doubtful and could serve, on the contrary, as a confirmation of the inevitability of the end.

Indeed, at the beginning of its development', and of an internationalism 'much more intimate than it ever was'. He pictured 'the unified organization of all the nations of the world', 'a new era in which nations and all mankind will consciously control their development'. 4<) He also predicted 'a real federation of nations' which 'will be accomplished only when the nations are free to unite on their own accord', and he added that 'the development of Europe points to that end'. He expected the small nations to be the first promoters of the idea of federation.

The Russian share is small, much smaller than that of the West. ,5 In concluding his remarks Fojtik declared that it was necessary 'to honour the truth of history, to know as much as possible about the greatness of the past, which, of course, is not based on legends'. A very noble principle indeed, but his abuse of Masaryk's authority was not in agreement with this credo. It is, of course, not customary for politicians or ideologues to distance themselves from the truth of history. It is a fact that different people see and interpret truth differently, even with the most noble intentions.

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