Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power by Matt Allington

By Matt Allington

Facts research expressions (DAX) is the formulation language of PowerPivot and this publication is written to offer hands-on perform to someone who desires to turn into useful at writing such formulation. pattern routines that designate each one proposal are supplied and through perform questions and solutions to maximise studying and adventure with DAX.

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These functions are not exactly the same, even though they can be used interchangeably at times. If you use COUNT() with TableName[ColumnName] and the column is missing a number in one of the rows (for some reason), then that row won't get counted. COUNTROWS() counts every row in the table, regardless of whether the columns have a value in every row. So be careful and make sure you select the best formula for the task at hand. Practice Exercises: COUNTROWS() In these exercises, you need to rewrite the two calculated fields from Practice Exercises 8 and 9 using ­COUNTROWS() instead of COUNT().

Did you use the correct column(s) in your calculated fields? Remember from the tooltip above that the COUNT() function counts numbers. It doesn't count text fields, so if you try to count the names or descriptions, you get an error. The COUNTROWS() Function Let's move on to a new function, COUNTROWS(). I personally prefer to use COUNTROWS() instead of COUNT(). It just seems more natural to me. These functions are not exactly the same, even though they can be used interchangeably at times. If you use COUNT() with TableName[ColumnName] and the column is missing a number in one of the rows (for some reason), then that row won't get counted.

Did you format the results as Number and Percentage? These formatting options are a bit hard to find. The dialog below shows how you set these options. 5: Concept: Filter Propagation 51 5: Concept: Filter Propagation It's time to talk about filter propagation. In Chapter 4 we looked at the COUNT() function and saw some strange behaviour with the [Total Number of Customers] calculated field. You need to understand the process of filter propagation before you can truly understand what is happening here.

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